This weekend, some of the biggest names in coffee—including Blue Bottle, Intelligentsia Coffee, and La Colombe—are donating a portion of their proceeds to the ACLU. This nationwide coffee fundraiser for the ACLU is a great way to make the most of your morning coffee—especially since these coffee shops hope to raise over $100,000 for the organization fighting against Trump’s Muslim ban. But this one fundraiser isn’t the only way to fight the power with your breakfast and your wallet. If there’s anything we’ve learned in the last week, it’s boycotts work. (Cough, Uber.) So make a commitment to support businesses that are doing the right thing, even when it comes to your food with these five things.

Go to Fundraisers

In addition to all of these coffee companies that are donating money to the ACLU over the course of the weekend, there are plenty of other restaurants, bakeries, cafes, even bars that are hosting fundraisers for progressive organizations like Planned Parenthood. Go to these, so that you can eat, drink, and support a good cause. These fundraisers might not be the most sustainable way to make a long-term change, but it's a good way to get a good meal and do a good thing at the same time.

Support Companies That Support Refugees

If you’re outraged about Trump’s executive order to limit immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries, support companies that have made a commitment to hiring refugees. For example, Starbucks has pledged to hire 10,000 refugees. They’re not alone, though. As many as 30 percent of employees at Chobani Yogurt’s plant in Idaho are former refugees, and Eli’s Cheesecake in Chicago, Illinois, recruits about 15 percent of its workforce from resettled refugees.

Check the Supply Chain

In Trump’s America, climate change is an “alternative fact,” so now’s the time more than ever to support companies that make a commitment to being environmentally sustainable. Peet’s Coffee, for example, roasts all of its beans in the country’s first LEED-certified coffee roasting facility. There are also plenty of coffee companies that are committed to serving fair trade beans, which ensures that workers around the world are treated ethically. 

Tip in Cash

Speaking of treating workers ethically, Trump’s pick for labor secretary Andrew Pudzer is firmly against substantially raising the minimum wage. And restaurant workers are often at the shortest end of this stick, relying on tips to make ends meet. So even though it’s easy to add a tip to your credit card receipt, if you can, tip in cash. That way, the server doesn’t have to wait for their paycheck—and there’s no risk that they’ll have to pay a credit card fee. 

There are increasingly more no-tipping restaurants, especially in New York City, which ensures that folks working both in the dining room and the kitchen are able to earn living, sustainable wages; go to those places for weekend brunch.

Buy Local

The best thing you can do is buy local, from the businesses in your neighborhood that are owned by the people who live in your neighborhood. And support them, even if that means they have to take a day off to protest themselves—like when more than 1,000 Yemeni-owned grocery stores and bodegas shut down on the afternoon of February 2, 2017 in protest of Trump’s executive order and customers throughout New York City left notes of support on the shuttered stores.