According to a couple of politicians from North Dakota, preparing and serving breakfast in bed is exactly how women should be spending their Sunday mornings. In perhaps the most dated, nonsensical, and backward argument against a repeal of North Dakota's very strict blue laws, two representatives explained that women should be using that time to make their husbands breakfast. As Representative Bernie Satrom explained on the floor of the statehouse, women should spend the morning, "Making him breakfast, bringing it to him and then after that, go take your kids for a walk." Representative Vernon Laning took it one step further, adding, "I don't know about you, but my wife has no problem spending everything I earn in six and a half days,” according to North Dakota's Valley News Live. "And I don’t think it hurts at all to have a half day off."

Let me explain this again in case the gravity of these politicians' statements weren't quite clear or you (somehow) still had any doubts that women face institutional sexism and systematic discrimination. Two Republican politicians stood on the floor of the North Dakota statehouse during a regular legislative session and said, on the record, that the best use of women's time on Sunday mornings was making breakfast for their husbands—and that was the main reason that state should not repeal its blue laws, which functionally prevent most businesses from opening before noon on Sundays, if at all. I'll say it a third time. According to two white men, giving women "time" to make breakfast for their husbands on Sunday morning and making sure they don't spend too much money is more important than letting stores open before noon.

The blatant sexism is galling, as is the fact that both politicians view their comments as jokes and so have no intention of apologizing. As Laning explained to Mic. in an email, all of the politicians in the room laughed at the joke, as did his wife of 46 years:

It was intended to be a humorous argument against those that stated the additional hours of shopping would enhance business with more shopping. People would still have the same amount of dollars to spend during the week. They would simply have a couple more hours to spend the same amount of money. I would prefer workers could at least have one four-hour period per week to attend church or rest.

Your wife is not your personal chef, though, and if she doesn't want to make you breakfast on Sunday mornings, she shouldn't. Also, she doesn't have to be married to you—or anyone, for that matter—at all.

But honestly, the worst part of all of this might be that breakfast in bed undisputedly sucks. It's bound to be crummy, in both the literal and figurative senses, and there's a significant risk of spilling something sticky on your sheets—and when that happens, you have to get out of bed to change your sheets, and that defeats the purpose of this whole enterprise, which was to stay in bed for as long as possible. Why on earth these two are pulling so hard for breakfast in bed is beyond me, and it's just further proof of how out of touch these politicians are with the real world.