Wouldn't it be great if all it took to get free avocado toast for a year was buying a house? So easy! So reasonable! Just take out a mortgage, and you, too, could be feasting upon the avocado toast of your dreams. It seems insane, but that's exactly what a Brisbane, Australia, realtor is promising the buyers of a not-yet-built townhouse in the neighborhood of Sherwood, according to TIME. If you buy the $595,000 house (that's about $440,000 in US dollars), the good people at Ray White Sherwood will throw in "free avocado on toast" from your favorite cafe once a weekend for a year to sweeten the deal. I don't know about you, but if I were buying a house to get free avocado toast, I'd hope that I could have it more than once every seven days.  

Apparently, this marketing ploy has its roots in an op-ed written by Bernard Salt that appeared in a weekend news magazine in October 2016. In it, he railed against millennial eating habits, saying, "I have seen young people order smashed avocado with crumbled feta on five-grain toasted bread at $22 a pop and more. ... But how can young people afford to eat like this? Shouldn't they be economising by eating at home? ... Twenty-two dollars several times a week could go towards a deposit on a house." 

This comes on the heels of a tired refrain that suggests millennials are spending all their money on lattes, or brunch, or fancy juice, or ______ (insert whatever food trend you'd like to there). Spending that money instead of saving it, is, apparently, ensuring young people will forever be without the funds for down payments on a house, and will never have children, and will live in their parents' house forever, spending every last bit of their freelancing creative class salary on vegetarian tasting menus and Unicorn Frappuccinos

Apparently, though, the promise of free avocado toast for a year is working. (The folks at Eater worked it out to be savings of about $700 a year.) The currently nonexistent townhouse—which will eventually boast an "entertainer's kitchen" and "chic design elements"—has six offers already. I guess millennials found some money after all.