Ever go rooting through your parents' liquor cabinet, or take a glance at the cocktail supplies shelf of your grocery store and notice a strange packet of powder touting a "creamy head"? Yeah—ew, on various levels, not the least of which is that this substance is trying to take the place of eggs. Not chugged down Rocky Balboa style (though hey, you do you), but rather as the ingredient that gives drinks like whiskey sours their heft and sudsy, silken top. We'll go so far as to say that if you haven't had a whiskey sour with an egg white in the mix, you've never really had one at all.

Seeing as Easter is nigh on here and there might be a few extra eggs on hand (and if you don't celebrate, this is entirely worth picking up a carton for), give a proper whiskey sour a try at home. Just a few words of advice: Buy the freshest possible eggs that you can, and store them in the coldest part of the fridge to make sure they stay safe. Consuming raw egg whites—and that's what we're talking about here—isn't for everyone, so make sure you warn any drinkers who might be sensitive to that physically or ethically. If it helps assuage anyone's worries, buy pasteurized eggs.

Separate out the yolks, and use them to make a marvelous homemade aioli, mayonnaise, hollandaise, or cure them and wow your brunch guests. Point is, you just need the whites for this, and you're going to want to "dry shake" them—meaning without ice—with the other ingredients before the final shake because they'll combine better at room temperature. Then do the final chill, strain, deck your masterpiece with a cherry, and crack a smile as you sip the best whiskey sour you've ever made.  

Classic Whiskey Sour

  • Yields: Makes one drink

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Pour all ingredient (except cherry) into a shaker, tightly seal it, and shake with great force for about 10 second. Open, add ice, reseal, and shake briefly to chill. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass or an old fashioned glass filled with ice and garnish.