Tortilla gadgetry is having a moment. For instance, a new tortilla toaster—the first of its kind—is currently trying to edge its way into the tortilla prep market. Called the Nuni Toaster, it only exists now as a working prototype, according to its website, but can toast up to six corn, wheat or flour tortillas in under a minute. Invented by a Chicago-based entrepreneur named Elliot Benitez, the idea for the toaster, which looks something like a bread slicer, came about when Benitez calculated that his mother had spent a total of 60 days over two decades warming up tortillas during family meals. That’s two months of tortilla toasting—time that could be better spent, one imagines, eating tortillas. Although it didn’t meet its (highly ambitious) $100,000 funding goal on Indiegogo (it only raised $7,146), the Nuni Toaster is currently seeking investors.

Another device, which the Nuni Toaster certainly complements, is the Flatev, otherwise known as the “Keurig of tortillas.” It recently raised about $137,000 on Kickstarter to bring on-demand tortillas to the masses. As with the Keurig, you insert a pod into a machine and out comes your indulgence. In the Flatev’s case, the pod is filled with doughs of varying flavor, the crispiness of which you can set on the machine. It takes about 90 seconds to pop out a dough disc. The Flatev will be available at retail stores in the fall of 2017, and according to the Verge, it will cost $437 (make of that what you will; pods will go for 79 cents each). Until then, you can reserve a Flatev on its website (there’s a limited supply). 

One thing the Flatev can’t do (yet, at least) is produce non-flat tortillas. For a little under $20, Nostalgia Electrics sells a tortilla shell maker, which transforms a store-bought tortilla into a crimped bowl in three to five minutes. (Though: hot tip! You can do that just by positioning a tortilla on the bottom side of a muffin tin.) The reviews on Amazon are mostly positive, despite the low price. Donald Trump, it’s easy to imagine, could put this item to good use when he loses the election and goes back to eating taco bowls at the Trump Grill on Cinco de Mayo. 

While he’s at it, he can throw a tortilla on the record player and tap his short fingers along to a bit of mariachi.