Few breakfast foods inspire as much devotion as bacon, but sometimes, that fervor has a dark side. Police in Marlborough, New Zealand are looking for a thief who stole 100 kilograms of bacon from a local business. That’s over 220 pounds of breakfast meat. According to Sergeant Kris Payne, in an interview to The Marlborough Express, “Nothing else has been taken, other than the meat.” Clearly, this burglar loves bacon, but it’s not the first time a bacon robbery has been reported in New Zealand this year. Less than three weeks ago, in Napier, New Zealand – a town about twelve hours drive from Marlborough – a woman “made off with several packets of sausages, bacon and other meat goods,” according to a report from Hawkes Bay Today. She was chased by store manager CJ Fu, who called it “one of the worst incidents he had been confronted with.”

Bacon robberies aren’t a uniquely Kiwi problem, though. In an unrelated, albeit higher value, Bacon heist, five paintings by Francis Bacon, worth over $25 million, were stolen from a museum in Spain this year. As for more breakfast meat-related crimes, in December 2014, a young man stole hundreds of pounds of bacon from a grocery store in Hampshire, England. On a smaller scale, in 2010, a thief in Surrey, England broke into a family’s home and stole a pack of bacon from their fridge, leaving a single raw slice on their doorknob. 

The United States has been rocked by bacon crimes, too. A Staten Island man stole 48 packs of bacon from a grocery store in 2014, attempting to hide the raw meat under his clothes, along with some beer and dog food. A woman was caught taking “five packs of bacon and two packs of chicken wings” from a Piggly Wiggly in Athens, Georgia in 2013, and when the store’s employees tried to confront her about her crime, she then shot them with pepper spray. The criminal was then sentenced to five years in prison, proving that bacon crime doesn’t pay.