A classic breakfast of golden, toasty pancakes is great for mornings before a big day, special weekend brunches, and, at the right scale, for bringing together an entire town. This week in Springfield, Massachusetts, the town is preparing to serve the world’s biggest pancake breakfast, a feat that will not be easy to achieve, but will definitely be delicious. The current world record for the biggest pancake breakfast belongs to Fargo, North Dakota’s Fargo Kiwanis Club, which served 34,818 pancakes at its Pancake Karnivale in 2008. Springfield may not break the record when they have their breakfast this weekend, but still bill the event as the “world’s biggest” pancake breakfast.

Thousands of people are expected to turn up for breakfast this Saturday on Main Street in Springfield, and as you might guess, there’s a lot of work that goes into making a breakfast of massive proportions. According to local news station WWLP, food prep has been underway since Wednesday when a crew started cooking up 1,008 pounds of bacon that will be served with the bounty of pancakes.

The annual tradition of serving pancake breakfast for the town started back in 1986, when Springfield started a friendly competition with Battle Creek, Michigan, once the home of Kellogg’s, to see who could dish out the most servings of breakfast. Springfield alternated between cereal and pancakes for a few years, but recently has stuck to the flapjacks (it’s a decidedly more impressive feat than cereal, let’s be honest).

Attendees can expect to meet thousands of their neighbors, and be served a hot breakfast of pancakes, bacon, and coffee. And there are no worries about supplies running out: WWLP reports that everyone who lines up for breakfast will get pancakes.

Maybe for an extra challenge next year, Springfield can take on the world record for the biggest pancake. This record has been unbroken since 1994, and belongs to the Co-operative Union Ltd in Manchester, England, whose proud members made a pancake that was a delicious, steamy 49 feet 3 inches in diameter, and 1 inch thick. Who knows how many hundreds of people that could feed, with only just one cake to flip! To be fair, it requires a crane to flip, but still.