There’s a chance you may have missed the greatest movie food scene. The dish created is not an elaborate meal prepared by a chef itching to prove themselves, nor a quirky pastel pastry created by a manic pixie dream girl—it’s the scrambled eggs dish made at the very end of Big Night. Are the scrambled eggs as exciting as the brothers’ multi-layered timpano? No, but the quiet brilliance of the way young Stanley Tucci as Secondo mixes up eggs and serves them to his brother, young mustachioed Tony Shalhoub (Chef Primo) and even younger Marc Anthony (waiter Cristiano), ending the meal with each brother’s arm draped over the other’s shoulder, is such a poignant display of resilience and love born from a passion for food cannot be matched. When describing the scene, some call the scrambled eggs an omelet and others call it a frittata, but as Secondo neither rolls, fills, nor bakes the eggs I like to call them frambled

While classic scrambled eggs are a solid weekday meal to devour quickly before the morning commute, Big Night-style frambled eggs is a dish best served after a really rough night. A night when you’ve likely woken up wearing clothes from the night before, but not for the fun reason. A night when nothing but good food and a come-what-may attitude could possibly make you feel any better. If you need to make Big Night frambled eggs, you might also need a hug, but mostly you need a good breakfast.

To make Secondo-level frambled eggs, heat a large stainless steel skillet over high and add a good glug of olive oil. Crack three eggs into a bowl and beat with a fork until frothy, about 15 seconds. Add a pinch of salt and mix again.

Pour the eggs into the pan and turn down the heat to medium. Use a wooden spoon to mix the eggs just a bit, then swirl the eggs around the edge of the pan. After about 30 seconds, flip the eggs in one movement. Cook for another few seconds, then take the pan off the heat. An alternative method of cooking frambled eggs can be done by cracking the eggs directly into the pan and scrambling them slightly with a wooden spoon, leaving some bits the classic butter yellow color, others white, and a few streaks of pure yolk. Flip the mixture after a minute or so, then pull the pan from the heat.

Divide the eggs onto three plates and eat with pieces of ciabatta bread ripped right from the loaf, eggs piled directly on top of the bread if you so choose.