There’s no denying my love for poached eggs. Just one bite of the silky white smeared with a slick of barely-solid yolk and the eggs have my full attention. Try as I may to make each poached egg as exciting as the first, after a few mornings of eating the same version, I catch myself getting bored. If this sounds familiar to you, instead of opting for a scramble, try switching up the poaching liquid. I’m sure you’ve heard of shakshuka, a Tunisian dish of eggs shallow-poached in thick tomato sauce, and that’s definitely an option when you’re tired of classic poaching. However, I also must suggest you take one step back to poaching eggs in thinner liquids other than water. There’s a sort of nuanced charm to poaching eggs in seasoned water, broth, and even wine. 

Unlike shakshuka, which is essentially a one-pan meal, flavored poached eggs simply swap (or season) the traditional water for another thin liquid. The result is a delicately flavored, oftentimes pastel-colored poached egg, just hoping to be treated equally to any other yolk and white combo one may find at brunch. Tip flavored poached eggs onto an English muffin for eggs Benedict or plunk a couple down into a steaming bowl of savory porridge.

For turmeric-poached eggs: Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring it to a boil. Crack an egg into a small bowl and line a clean plate with paper towels. When the water is boiling, add 2 tablespoons white vinegar, 2 teaspoons ground turmeric, and 3 smashed garlic cloves to the pot and stir well. Reduce the heat to keep the water gently simmering, then pour in the egg. Poach the egg for 2-3 minutes, then pull it out with a slotted spoon and dry it off on the paper towels.

For broth-poached eggs: In a medium saucepan, bring a few cups of bone broth, chicken broth, vegetable broth, or chile broth (stock or broth of your choice simmered for 20 minutes with 1 thinly sliced Frenso chile.) Crack an egg into a small bowl and line a clean plate with paper towels. Reduce the heat to keep the broth simmering, then pour in the egg. Poach the egg for 2-3 minutes, then pull it out with a slotted spoon and dry it off on the paper towels.

For red wine-poached eggs: Bring 2 cups of wine, 2 cups of stock, and a bouquet garni (cheesecloth packet tied with trussing twine) of a few sprigs of thyme, parsley, black peppercorns, and 1 bay leaf to a boil in a medium saucepan. Crack an egg into a small bowl and line a clean plate with paper towels. Reduce the heat to keep the brothy wine simmering, then pour in the egg. Poach the egg for 2-3 minutes, then pull it out with a slotted spoon and dry it off on the paper towels.