If there's one thing that makes a peach a peach, it's the fruit's signature fuzzy skin. It's really the main difference between a peach and a nectarine—and part of the reason some people strongly prefer nectarines, with their smoother, less velvety skin. A peach's fuzz is divisive, and for some, it's just too much to handle. So what if I told you that you could peel a peach and completely remove the fuzzy skin from the soft, sweet peachy flesh in less than five seconds without any fancy devices or risk of cutting your hands with a knife or a vegetable peeler? You'd probably be shocked, because who what does a peach look like without its skin anyway?

Well, one Japanese Twitter user who goes by the name Okada recently learned how to peel a peach and decided to share this skill—and the resulting naked peach—with the rest of the internet. In a clip that's only three seconds long, Okada seamlessly peels the entire skin off of a peach without a knife. In three seconds! The video, which has received over 52,000 retweets, is just as fascinating and oddly satisfying as you might imagine. Others, however, might find this clip kind of horrifying, depending on how you feel about watching skin get ripped off a fresh fruit (or any living thing for that matter)—especially when you're used to seeing the fruit in its skin.

Needless to say, Twitter freaked out about this revelation.

Others couldn't help but make the comparison between the peeled peach and the part of the human anatomy that is best represented by the peach emoji, especially when freed from its skin.

What's perhaps most shocking is this technique for peeling peaches isn't anything new, and Okada isn't some kind of peach genius. There are, after all, some legitimate reasons why one might need to actually quickly peel a peach. Perhaps you're making a peach cobbler or peach preserves or you're just trying to freeze the fruit for the coming winter.

To peel peaches in one fell swoop, you first need to blanche them. That means you get a pot of boiling water going, drop the peaches in for about a minute, take them out, then dunk them in cold water to stop the cooking process. You can then easily score and peel off the skin with your bare hands, like you're a superhero.

But there's something about the way the skin of the peach slides off the flesh of the fruit quickly and easily that makes me feel like I'm watching a scene straight out of the Silence of the Lambs. It's practical, sure. But at what cost?