If you've ever had a breakfast taco, you know how refreshing a radish can be when eaten for breakfast. But radishes that have gone soft are nowhere near as satisfying as crispy, fresh, and slightly spicy radishes. So how do you keep radishes crisp and tasting fresh for as long as possible? You learn how to store radishes properly, of course. And since radishes are basically a root vegetable, which are known for being hardy, they're easier to keep fresh than you might think.

The first step to storing radishes correctly is to remove the radish root from the leafy greens. That's because the leaves will start to decompose quicker than the actual radish roots, and leaving rotting leaves attached to the radishes can kickstart the spoiling process. (The editors at Cook's Illustrated do note that removing the leaves from the radishes won't necessarily extend the life of either, especially if you're vigilant about removing the rotting leaves—but if you're not one of those people, make it easy on yourself and just cut it off.) You don't have to throw away the radish leaves, though; you can sautée them and make a delicious meal out of what would otherwise go to compost.

Once you've removed the leaves from the radish roots, there's not much left to do. Don't wash the radishes before you put them in the fridge—and yes, radishes should be refrigerated. Place the radishes in a plastic bag, and seal it, so these vegetables don't lose moisture and stay crisp to the bite. According to Martha Stewart, this storage method will keep your radishes crisp for up to a week, and when you're ready to use your radishes, take them out of the bag and rinse them in cold water to get any dirt off.

If your radishes do seem a little soft, you can revive them by putting them in a bowl of ice water for about an hour before using them. That'll help to add some moisture back into them, giving you that crispness you want from a great radish.