For centuries, humankind was happy with a warm piece of toasted bread topped with a simple pat of butter, maybe a spot of jam if they were feeling fancy. Then, some genius discovered that butter could easily be replaced with a smooshed avocado and a sprinkle of sea salt and a revolution began. Somehow three simple ingredients begat tens of thousands of thinkpieces and millions of photographs so that this, the most glorious era in recorded history, might never been forgotten. Yet despite these efforts, concern over its legacy is real—after all, humankind began putting avocados on toast over two whole years ago. (OK, a few decades longer than that, but if you didn't Instagram it, it didn't happen.)

There are ways to keep our cultural touchstones alive while also racing towards the future at lightning speeds on the Innovation Express. It may have taken millennia to figure out we could put avocado on a piece of toast, but it only took about eighteen months for people to discover you could put other things on top of the avocado that was on top of the toast. Things that would not veer it into open faced sandwich territory, but allow it to honor mankind’s sacred traditions and keeping its feet planted in the toast camp. What a time to be alive. 

If you are ready to shake up your morning, dukkah—a classic Egyptian flavor combo—may be just the thing for you. More than a spice blend but not quite a schmear, a generous coating of this fragrant, crunchy mixture instantly improves just about anything: succulent grilled meats, salty feta cheese, warm flatbread sopped with rich olive oil. It's a logical disruption for your precious avocado toast. After a few weeks you may even work your way up to dukkah and ricotta toasts. Big things are in store for you, my friend. 

Dukkah

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Add hazelnuts to a large sauté pan over medium heat. Cook for 2 minutes while shaking. Add sunflower, white sesame and fennel seeds, and continue to toast for another 2 minutes. Add the remainder of the spices while shaking the pan, cook until they become fragrant, about 1 minute.

  2. Put the contents of the pan into a food processor and pulse until bits are well chopped and resembles coarse crumbs. Store in a jar in the refrigerator, use generously on anything you damn well please.