Jet Tila is the author of 101 Asian Dishes You Need to Cook Before You Die and a judge on Cutthroat Kitchen. When he visited Extra Crispy, we asked him to show us a recipe that even a novice chef could master. He recommended sew mai, the traditional dim sum drum dumpling that literally translates to “cook and sell” and can also be spelled siew mai or siu mai. Chef Tila makes his sew mai with ground pork, black mushrooms, and shrimp. He grounds his pork by hand, but says pre-ground pork will do just fine. If you want to get technical, he says to ask your butcher for pork butt, single ground large-die.

The recipe is foolproof as long as you follow some simple guidelines. First, don’t chop the ingredients too large or too small to achieve perfect mouth feel. Second, when choosing your wonton skins make sure they are yellow. That means there’s egg. Third, use the “ultimate Chinese flavoring": not soy sauce, but oyster sauce.

Watch and learn to make this dim sum classic for yourself. Steam and eat immediately, or keep covered in your freezer and steam at a later date to literally have dim sum for days.